Vegetarian

Vietnamese Style Yogurt in the Instant Pot

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Yogurt WaterMark

I’ve lately grown to like the flavor of plain yogurt with its rich and tarty taste, smooth and creamy in texture.  But its hard to pass up a sweetened version of this friendly bacteria filled thick milky concoction.  That doesn’t sound too good does it?  But trust me, I don’t think even a non-yogurt enthusiast would say no to this after a bite!  I think we could have finished the whole batch if we didn’t have an ounce of self control – ha!

I had ordered this during a trip to Vietnam where it came in a tiny jar of about 4oz.  It was delicious and probably costed about $3USD.  So for the level of labor that goes into producing this yummy treat, I’d gladly make it at home.

Needless to say, kid and hubby approved.  Even my anti-sour kiddo asked for more!  Are you convinced yet?  Here’s the recipe, give it a go and try not to finish it all in a day :).

Ingredients:

(Use the condensed milk can to measure out the rest of the ingredients)
1 can of sweetened condensed milk
1 can of hot water or milk
2 cans of whole milk
1 can of plain yogurt
optional fruits

Directions:
– Pour out the can of condensed milk into a large mixing bowl/container.
– Use the now empty can to measure the rest of the ingredients.
– Measure 1 can milk or water and pour it into a heat proof container to warm up (either microwave or stovetop).
– Pour the warm milk or water into the condensed milk and mix it until dissolved.
– Add 2 cans of the whole milk.
– Check the temperature of the mixture and be sure it’s not too hot (should be under 115 degrees F).  We don’t want to kill off the cultures.
– Add 1 can of plain yogurt.
– Mix it all up.
– (Note: add your fruits to the empty jars at this time)
– Pour into jars/containers and cover with lid.
– Pour a cup of water into the inner pot and put on the trivet.
– Place or stack the yogurt jars/containers onto the trivet.
– Press the “Yogurt” button which defaults to 8 hours.  (I adjusted to 11 hours for a thicker texture).
– Wait patiently because it’ll be worth it!  Enjoy!

YogurtWM

NOTE: I noticed that some brands of yogurt, particularly Greek, are smoother than others.  So choosing to use creamier yogurt will probably yield a smoother texture in your batch.

Video for this recipe:

Yard Long Bean Legume in Disguise

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While looking up the nutritional information for what I knew by the name of Yard Long Bean or Snake bean, I was amazed to learn of numerous other names these long snaky stems go by, namely bora, bodi, long-podded cowpea, asparagus bean, pea bean, snake bean, or Chinese long bean.  Now mind you, it is not nearly as long as a yard as the name implies.  Rather, it would stand half a yard long if it could stand.  Also surprising was that it is in fact a legume and not a vegetable as I had automatically assumed due to its physical similarity to green beans.  Though acting as a legume, it is widely cooked like some vegetables.  I enjoy cutting them up and stir frying with eggs or with fish paste/cake as seen below.  They are also great cooking up with kabocha squash stew and even in soups and salads.

But wait, it doesn’t seize to impress there.  The nutrition benefits are greater than it’s usage and even more than the number of names!  These long vegetable looking beans are packed with protein, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, iron, phosphorus, potassium, vitamin C, folate, magnesium, and manganese.  I’m even more excited and convinced after typing all that out.  So much that I think I’ll be attempting to grow these lovelies this soon!  And it’s said that pods will form just 60 days after sowing!  If you decide to grow these, be sure and pick them before they reach full maturity for more crispy texture.  A tip I’ll keep in mind is not to pick off the buds as more beans will sprout from that the same stem!  Once producing, we can expect to harvest daily until winter hits.  That’s a lot of yard long beans to enjoy :).

Fish Cake
Yard Long Bean with Fish Cake Stir Fry

 

Some interesting findings that may be of interest is:
– Ants and yellow jackets are attracted to this legume.
– It’s subtropical/tropical and most widely grown in the warmer parts of South and Southeast Asia as well as southern China.  (Lucky us, we have it available here in the states).