Month: August 2016

Instant Pot Spaghetti Bolognese

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Here’s the recipe to make these scrumptious poppers:

Ingredients:
4 cloves garlic minced
1/2 cup onions chopped
8oz ground meat
1 t salt
dash pepper
1 T Italian spice mix
1 cup water
1 cup milk
2 cups spaghetti sauce
Extra cup of water/milk

Directions:
-Soak pasta noodles in water for 30-60 min to soften then drain.
-Heat up the instant pot by selecting “Saute” function, then wait for the display to go from “on” to “hot”.
-Pour in the oil.
-Add the garlic and onions and saute for about 2 minutes.
-Add in the ground meat and stir about a minute.
-Add the Italian spices, salt, and pepper and continue cooking the meat until it turns brown.
-Pour in the water, milk, drained noodles and spaghetti sauce.
-If existing liquid isn’t enough to cover the pasta, add in more water or milk to cover.
-Loosen up the noodles to avoid sticking together.
-Cover and lock the lid, and turn vent to “Sealing”.
-Select the manual setting and change time to 5 or 6 minutes.
-Once done cooking, slowly release the pressure valve and open the lid.
-Note: If you want softer pasta, put the lid back on and lock.  Then let it cook about 15-60 minute more.
-Serve immediately.

Here’s the visual to this recipe:

Enjoy and would love to hear how you liked it in the comments!

Yard Long Bean Legume in Disguise

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While looking up the nutritional information for what I knew by the name of Yard Long Bean or Snake bean, I was amazed to learn of numerous other names these long snaky stems go by, namely bora, bodi, long-podded cowpea, asparagus bean, pea bean, snake bean, or Chinese long bean.  Now mind you, it is not nearly as long as a yard as the name implies.  Rather, it would stand half a yard long if it could stand.  Also surprising was that it is in fact a legume and not a vegetable as I had automatically assumed due to its physical similarity to green beans.  Though acting as a legume, it is widely cooked like some vegetables.  I enjoy cutting them up and stir frying with eggs or with fish paste/cake as seen below.  They are also great cooking up with kabocha squash stew and even in soups and salads.

But wait, it doesn’t seize to impress there.  The nutrition benefits are greater than it’s usage and even more than the number of names!  These long vegetable looking beans are packed with protein, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, iron, phosphorus, potassium, vitamin C, folate, magnesium, and manganese.  I’m even more excited and convinced after typing all that out.  So much that I think I’ll be attempting to grow these lovelies this soon!  And it’s said that pods will form just 60 days after sowing!  If you decide to grow these, be sure and pick them before they reach full maturity for more crispy texture.  A tip I’ll keep in mind is not to pick off the buds as more beans will sprout from that the same stem!  Once producing, we can expect to harvest daily until winter hits.  That’s a lot of yard long beans to enjoy :).

Fish Cake
Yard Long Bean with Fish Cake Stir Fry

 

Some interesting findings that may be of interest is:
– Ants and yellow jackets are attracted to this legume.
– It’s subtropical/tropical and most widely grown in the warmer parts of South and Southeast Asia as well as southern China.  (Lucky us, we have it available here in the states).